7834-people-rescued-by-RNLI-lifeboats-–-2007-statistics-revealed

Byline: 7,834 people rescued by RNLI lifeboats – 2007 statistics revealed
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7,834 people rescued by RNLI lifeboats – 2007 statistics revealed
 
One of the busiest years on record – Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) annual lifeboat and lifeguard rescue statistics for 2007 reveal over half (52%) of lifeboat launches were to leisure craft (note 1)
 
Final figures show that the RNLI’s lifeboats were launched 8,141 times during 2007, rescuing 7,834 people. More than half of the 8,141 RNLI lifeboat launches – 4,287 – were to recreational sea users in leisure craft. This figure is down slightly on 2006 rescues (4,361), perhaps due to the unseasonable weather in the early summer months.
 
Of the 4,287 RNLI lifeboat launches to leisure craft in 2007 almost half (43%) were to powered craft (note 2) well over a third (40%) of lifeboat launches were to the aid of sailing craft (note 3) and 17% were to manual leisure craft (note 4).
 
The major cause for RNLI lifeboat launches to (manual, power and sailing) leisure craft, as in previous years, was overwhelmingly machinery failure (29% of incidents), this is followed by craft being stranded or grounded (13%) and vessels meeting adverse weather conditions (9%) as the three main causes for lifeboat launches to leisure craft in 2007.
 
The top three reasons for lifeboat launches to each specific type of leisure craft in 2007 were machinery or engine failure for both power and sailing leisure craft, while the impact of adverse weather conditions was the main reason for lifeboat launches to manual leisure craft. The final RNLI rescue figures for 2007 also show an increase in the number of man overboard incidents for leisure craft – rising from 161 (2006) to 201 (2007), up 25% from 2006.
 
Commenting on the rise in RNLI rescues to man overboard incidents, RNLI Sea Safety Manager, Peter Chennell says:
 
‘Although only a relatively small percentage of the total reasons for lifeboat call-outs to leisure boaters, it’s worrying to see such a large increase in man overboard incidents. It is hoped the boating public have started to take on board the RNLI’s lifejacket awareness campaign message, useless unless worn.
 
‘We’re aiming to encourage more of the boating community to automatically put their lifejackets on when they go to sea and decide when to take them off, because experience tells us that in an emergency there is not always time to make sure your lifejacket is securely and correctly fitted. Wearing a lifejacket is one of the RNLI’s five sea safety tips along with: checking your engine and fuel; telling others where you’re going; carrying some means of calling for help; and keeping an eye on weather and tides.’
 
Despite fewer visitors to the coast during the early summer months (note 5) due to the unseasonable weather, RNLI lifeboats and lifeguards continued to respond to a high number of calls for help, as more and more people are using the water and beaches for leisure pursuits. RNLI lifeguards, who were operational on 71 beaches in the south west of England and East Anglia, rescued 1,350 people, came to the aid of a further 9,883 people and responded to 8,201 incidents. The wet summer weather also meant that the RNLI’s Flood Rescue Team and volunteer lifeboat crews were particularly active inland, rescuing another 200 people in flood hit areas across the UK during the summer months.
Ends
 
For more information on the RNLI Annual Statistics please telephone the RNLI Press Office on 01202 336000 or email pressoffice@rnli.org.uk
 
 
Notes to editors:
Tower lifeboat station on the River Thames was the busiest RNLI lifeboat station, launching 265 times and rescuing 92 people. Around the coast, busy stations included Torbay lifeboat station, which launched 131 times, rescuing 137 people, and the RNLI’s Southend lifeboat station launched 131 times and rescued 121 people. 
  • The RNLI is a registered charity that continues to rely on voluntary contributions, corporate donations and legacies for income and receives no UK Government funding.
  • The RNLI’s annual running costs are over £122M – approximately £335,000 per day.
  • There are over 230 RNLI lifeboat stations across the UK and Ireland, which are operated by 4,800 RNLI lifeboat crew members, of which 95 per cent are volunteers.
  • The RNLI’s 2007 inland flood response was carried out by volunteer lifeboat crews from around the coast and members of the RNLI’s Flood Rescue Team* (which is on 24-hour standby to respond to flooding emergencies both at home and abroad).
*Volunteers at the RNLI’s lifeboat stations in the UK and Republic of Ireland, were asked if they wished to volunteer for the RNLI’s Flood Rescue Team, which the charity set up following its involvement with flood relief in Mozambique in March 2000. Those selected were trained in swift water and survival techniques, and other specialist skills.
 
The RNLI online
For more information on the RNLI please visit www.rnli.org.uk or www.rnli.ie. News releases and other media resources are available at www.rnli.org.uk/press.
 
End Notes:
1. Leisure craft includes power, sail and manual craft
2. Powered craft includes: dive boats, jet skis, large (over 5 metres) and small (under 5 metres) powerboats.
3. Sailing craft includes: kite and windsurfers, dinghies, large and small sailing yachts.
4 . Manual craft includes: kayaks, rowing boats, surfboards, air beds and also includes small tenders.
5. Overall, RNLI estimates show a reduction in beach visitor numbers in 2007 on the beaches where its lifeguards were operational when compared to 2006 (from 5,455,398 visitors in 2006 to 5,167,306 in 2007 on beaches in Bournemouth, Poole, Weymouth, South Hams, Caradon, Restormel, Carrick, North Cornwall, North Devon and Torridge). In 2007, RNLI lifeguards were also operational on beaches in North Norfolk, West Dorset, Exmouth and Bude.
 

 

 
 
 
 
Byline: 7,834 people rescued by RNLI lifeboats – 2007 statistics revealed
Page Content:
7,834 people rescued by RNLI lifeboats – 2007 statistics revealed
 
One of the busiest years on record – Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) annual lifeboat and lifeguard rescue statistics for 2007 reveal over half (52%) of lifeboat launches were to leisure craft (note 1)
 
Final figures show that the RNLI’s lifeboats were launched 8,141 times during 2007, rescuing 7,834 people. More than half of the 8,141 RNLI lifeboat launches – 4,287 – were to recreational sea users in leisure craft. This figure is down slightly on 2006 rescues (4,361), perhaps due to the unseasonable weather in the early summer months.
 
Of the 4,287 RNLI lifeboat launches to leisure craft in 2007 almost half (43%) were to powered craft (note 2) well over a third (40%) of lifeboat launches were to the aid of sailing craft (note 3) and 17% were to manual leisure craft (note 4).
 
The major cause for RNLI lifeboat launches to (manual, power and sailing) leisure craft, as in previous years, was overwhelmingly machinery failure (29% of incidents), this is followed by craft being stranded or grounded (13%) and vessels meeting adverse weather conditions (9%) as the three main causes for lifeboat launches to leisure craft in 2007.
 
The top three reasons for lifeboat launches to each specific type of leisure craft in 2007 were machinery or engine failure for both power and sailing leisure craft, while the impact of adverse weather conditions was the main reason for lifeboat launches to manual leisure craft. The final RNLI rescue figures for 2007 also show an increase in the number of man overboard incidents for leisure craft – rising from 161 (2006) to 201 (2007), up 25% from 2006.
 
Commenting on the rise in RNLI rescues to man overboard incidents, RNLI Sea Safety Manager, Peter Chennell says:
 
‘Although only a relatively small percentage of the total reasons for lifeboat call-outs to leisure boaters, it’s worrying to see such a large increase in man overboard incidents. It is hoped the boating public have started to take on board the RNLI’s lifejacket awareness campaign message, useless unless worn.
 
‘We’re aiming to encourage more of the boating community to automatically put their lifejackets on when they go to sea and decide when to take them off, because experience tells us that in an emergency there is not always time to make sure your lifejacket is securely and correctly fitted. Wearing a lifejacket is one of the RNLI’s five sea safety tips along with: checking your engine and fuel; telling others where you’re going; carrying some means of calling for help; and keeping an eye on weather and tides.’
 
Despite fewer visitors to the coast during the early summer months (note 5) due to the unseasonable weather, RNLI lifeboats and lifeguards continued to respond to a high number of calls for help, as more and more people are using the water and beaches for leisure pursuits. RNLI lifeguards, who were operational on 71 beaches in the south west of England and East Anglia, rescued 1,350 people, came to the aid of a further 9,883 people and responded to 8,201 incidents. The wet summer weather also meant that the RNLI’s Flood Rescue Team and volunteer lifeboat crews were particularly active inland, rescuing another 200 people in flood hit areas across the UK during the summer months.
Ends
 
For more information on the RNLI Annual Statistics please telephone the RNLI Press Office on 01202 336000 or email pressoffice@rnli.org.uk
 
 
Notes to editors:
Tower lifeboat station on the River Thames was the busiest RNLI lifeboat station, launching 265 times and rescuing 92 people. Around the coast, busy stations included Torbay lifeboat station, which launched 131 times, rescuing 137 people, and the RNLI’s Southend lifeboat station launched 131 times and rescued 121 people. 
  • The RNLI is a registered charity that continues to rely on voluntary contributions, corporate donations and legacies for income and receives no UK Government funding.
  • The RNLI’s annual running costs are over £122M – approximately £335,000 per day.
  • There are over 230 RNLI lifeboat stations across the UK and Ireland, which are operated by 4,800 RNLI lifeboat crew members, of which 95 per cent are volunteers.
  • The RNLI’s 2007 inland flood response was carried out by volunteer lifeboat crews from around the coast and members of the RNLI’s Flood Rescue Team* (which is on 24-hour standby to respond to flooding emergencies both at home and abroad).
*Volunteers at the RNLI's lifeboat stations in the UK and Republic of Ireland, were asked if they wished to volunteer for the RNLI’s Flood Rescue Team, which the charity set up following its involvement with flood relief in Mozambique in March 2000. Those selected were trained in swift water and survival techniques, and other specialist skills.
 
The RNLI online
For more information on the RNLI please visit www.rnli.org.uk or www.rnli.ie. News releases and other media resources are available at www.rnli.org.uk/press.
 
End Notes:
1. Leisure craft includes power, sail and manual craft
2. Powered craft includes: dive boats, jet skis, large (over 5 metres) and small (under 5 metres) powerboats.
3. Sailing craft includes: kite and windsurfers, dinghies, large and small sailing yachts.
4 . Manual craft includes: kayaks, rowing boats, surfboards, air beds and also includes small tenders.
5. Overall, RNLI estimates show a reduction in beach visitor numbers in 2007 on the beaches where its lifeguards were operational when compared to 2006 (from 5,455,398 visitors in 2006 to 5,167,306 in 2007 on beaches in Bournemouth, Poole, Weymouth, South Hams, Caradon, Restormel, Carrick, North Cornwall, North Devon and Torridge). In 2007, RNLI lifeguards were also operational on beaches in North Norfolk, West Dorset, Exmouth and Bude.