No-time-for-sunbathing-as-Rhyl-RNLi-lifeboat-crews-spend-day-at-sea!

Byline: The volunteer crew at Rhyl RNLI lifeboat station were at the boathouse for their usual Sunday morning training session.
Page Content:

A call to Holyhead coastguard from a small leisure fishing vessel off Rhyl stated that the vessel had lost all engine power. They were about 1.5 miles North-West of the station. They had an anchor down, and they required assistance to get back to Rhyl. As the tide was out at the time, the vessel could not get into Rhyl harbour, so the Inshore lifeboat was launched to check everything was OK. All the 4 people on board were wearing lifejackets, and were all safe, so the lifeboat returned to the shore.

At about 1pm, the All-weather lifeboat from Rhyl was launched. The casualty vessel had dragged it’s anchor, and now was about 2.5 miles from the station. The lifeboat arrived and started to tow the vessel back to Rhyl, with the incoming tide providing sufficient depth of water to get into the harbour.

The boat had started off from Rhyl harbour, getting under the new footbridge in the harbour, which is inoperational at this time, so cannot raise or lower. It was not possible to get the lifeboat under the bridge, and so the Inshore lifeboat was re-launched and took over the tow into the harbour. Once the casualty boat was safely on a mooring, both lifeboats returned to station at 3.15pm.

At 3.23pm, a call was made to Holyhead coastguard from North Wales Police, stating they had received 999 calls saying a kayak had capsized out from Pensarn, Abergele. Both boats again launched and were proceeding when the police told the coastguards they thought this was a hoax call. The lifeboats and local coastguards carried on to the scene, and the lifeboat crews found a kayak on the beach with local police. The man in the kayak said it was him in the water, but he was safe now after playing around on his boat.The incident definitely was not a hoax. He apologised to the marine rescue services, and all marine units were stood down, the lifeboats returning to station by 4.35pm.

The volunteer crews of the RNLI and local coastguards had been on service for 7 hours in total.

The attached picture shows Rhyl lifeboat approaching the broken down vessel off Rhyl, and transferring the tow to Rhyl inshore lifeboat in Rhyl harbour.

Further information from Rhyl RNLI Press Officer Paul Frost MBE on 07894 105165.

Byline: The volunteer crew at Rhyl RNLI lifeboat station were at the boathouse for their usual Sunday morning training session.
Page Content:

A call to Holyhead coastguard from a small leisure fishing vessel off Rhyl stated that the vessel had lost all engine power. They were about 1.5 miles North-West of the station. They had an anchor down, and they required assistance to get back to Rhyl. As the tide was out at the time, the vessel could not get into Rhyl harbour, so the Inshore lifeboat was launched to check everything was OK. All the 4 people on board were wearing lifejackets, and were all safe, so the lifeboat returned to the shore.

At about 1pm, the All-weather lifeboat from Rhyl was launched. The casualty vessel had dragged it's anchor, and now was about 2.5 miles from the station. The lifeboat arrived and started to tow the vessel back to Rhyl, with the incoming tide providing sufficient depth of water to get into the harbour.

The boat had started off from Rhyl harbour, getting under the new footbridge in the harbour, which is inoperational at this time, so cannot raise or lower. It was not possible to get the lifeboat under the bridge, and so the Inshore lifeboat was re-launched and took over the tow into the harbour. Once the casualty boat was safely on a mooring, both lifeboats returned to station at 3.15pm.

At 3.23pm, a call was made to Holyhead coastguard from North Wales Police, stating they had received 999 calls saying a kayak had capsized out from Pensarn, Abergele. Both boats again launched and were proceeding when the police told the coastguards they thought this was a hoax call. The lifeboats and local coastguards carried on to the scene, and the lifeboat crews found a kayak on the beach with local police. The man in the kayak said it was him in the water, but he was safe now after playing around on his boat.The incident definitely was not a hoax. He apologised to the marine rescue services, and all marine units were stood down, the lifeboats returning to station by 4.35pm.

The volunteer crews of the RNLI and local coastguards had been on service for 7 hours in total.

The attached picture shows Rhyl lifeboat approaching the broken down vessel off Rhyl, and transferring the tow to Rhyl inshore lifeboat in Rhyl harbour.

Further information from Rhyl RNLI Press Officer Paul Frost MBE on 07894 105165.