The-new-Shannon-arrives-for-Montroses-special-day

Byline: One of the oldest lifeboat stations has celebrated a move back into the heart of the community.
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The RNLI in Montrose has opened a new station building in front of 150 guests in a prominent position close to the town centre.

The charity has moved from a position in the heart of the operational side of Montrose port where it was largely hidden from the public’s view to Wharf Street, close to the A92.

The guests enjoyed an official opening ceremony on Saturday 20 July – and they were given an unexpected treat when the RNLI’s newest class of lifeboat visited the station.

Montrose will be the first RNLI station in Scotland to receive a Shannon lifeboat. The first Shannon has been built and it is currently undergoing sea trials around the coastline, which included a visit to Montrose on Saturday.

Montrose’s current lifeboat is a Tyne class. The Moonbeam arrived in Montrose in 1989 and it is expected that its Shannon replacement will arrive in 2015.

Paul Jennings, the RNLI’s Divisional Operations Manager for the area, said, ‘The ceremony marked the completion of nearly two years of building work. This purpose-built station provides easy access to the harbour, crew parking, a changing room, space for training, a retail outlet, and a boathouse for both the inshore D class and all-weather lifeboat. These facilities combine to provide a quicker rescue response time, alongside a greater public presence for the RNLI.

‘Over the next few years, Montrose will be the first Scottish station to receive the new Shannon class all-weather lifeboat. Designed by the RNLI’s own naval architects, this is the first lifeboat to be powered by twin water jets instead of propellers. This makes her faster and more manoeuvrable when reaching casualties.’

He added, ‘We celebrate a building that honours this station’s rich lifeboating history and gives its volunteer crews the very best facilities and equipment to continue saving lives at sea for years to come.’

The building cost more than £1million to build with a substantial amount of that coming from legacies from Miss Agnes McColl Rowan, Hugh and Molly Brown and Dr Sheila Margaret Bain. The Montrose Lifeboat Guild launched a Montrose Cook Book during an appeal for funds and this raised £10,000. Members of the Guild were on hand to see how the money raised had been put to good use in the design of an eye-catching new building.

There were also significant contributions from Montrose Area Furniture Recycling and Distribution, and Thomas Robertson’s Charitable Trust.

A generous legacy has also funded the new Shannon boat for Montrose with the money coming from the estate of Ruth Grant Smith. The boat will be named after her late husband Ian Grant Smith.

Notes to Editor: *Montrose is no stranger to innovations and relocations over a long history. Its first lifeboat, an eight crew rowing boat, had an exposed site at the south-west corner of the town’s bleachfield in 1807. This was one of five lifeboats placed on the coast of Scotland by Henry Greathead. Henry was the builder of the Original in 1789, the first boat to be built expressly for the purpose of saving life from shipwreck.

*In 1819, a lifeboat house was built beneath the lightkeeper’s house. Then, half a century later, the station moved further up the South Esk estuary and a slipway was added. In 1885, an additional lifeboat house was constructed at Kirkside on the north bank of the North Esk, where the St Cyrus Wildlife Centre is now located. A new lifeboat house was completed in 1900, with the old boathouse sold to Montrose Harbour Board for £100. More recent decades have seen lifeboats kept afloat at all times within the operational area of the port.

*The Shannon class features twin water jets instead of conventional propellers, allowing it to operate in shallow waters and be highly manoeuvrable. It has a top speed of 25 knots compared with Montrose’s current Tyne boat (17 knots) and, like all RNLI all-weather lifeboats, it is self-righting.

*The RNLI has a tradition of naming lifeboats after rivers or stretches of water, and the Shannon is named after the River Shannon in Ireland.

RNLI Media Contacts: Richard Smith, RNLI Public Relations Manager for Scotland, 07786 668903. Email Richard_Smith@rnli.org.uk

Byline: One of the oldest lifeboat stations has celebrated a move back into the heart of the community.
Page Content:

The RNLI in Montrose has opened a new station building in front of 150 guests in a prominent position close to the town centre.

The charity has moved from a position in the heart of the operational side of Montrose port where it was largely hidden from the public’s view to Wharf Street, close to the A92.

The guests enjoyed an official opening ceremony on Saturday 20 July – and they were given an unexpected treat when the RNLI’s newest class of lifeboat visited the station.

Montrose will be the first RNLI station in Scotland to receive a Shannon lifeboat. The first Shannon has been built and it is currently undergoing sea trials around the coastline, which included a visit to Montrose on Saturday.

Montrose’s current lifeboat is a Tyne class. The Moonbeam arrived in Montrose in 1989 and it is expected that its Shannon replacement will arrive in 2015.

Paul Jennings, the RNLI’s Divisional Operations Manager for the area, said, ‘The ceremony marked the completion of nearly two years of building work. This purpose-built station provides easy access to the harbour, crew parking, a changing room, space for training, a retail outlet, and a boathouse for both the inshore D class and all-weather lifeboat. These facilities combine to provide a quicker rescue response time, alongside a greater public presence for the RNLI.

‘Over the next few years, Montrose will be the first Scottish station to receive the new Shannon class all-weather lifeboat. Designed by the RNLI’s own naval architects, this is the first lifeboat to be powered by twin water jets instead of propellers. This makes her faster and more manoeuvrable when reaching casualties.’

He added, ‘We celebrate a building that honours this station’s rich lifeboating history and gives its volunteer crews the very best facilities and equipment to continue saving lives at sea for years to come.’

The building cost more than £1million to build with a substantial amount of that coming from legacies from Miss Agnes McColl Rowan, Hugh and Molly Brown and Dr Sheila Margaret Bain. The Montrose Lifeboat Guild launched a Montrose Cook Book during an appeal for funds and this raised £10,000. Members of the Guild were on hand to see how the money raised had been put to good use in the design of an eye-catching new building.

There were also significant contributions from Montrose Area Furniture Recycling and Distribution, and Thomas Robertson’s Charitable Trust.

A generous legacy has also funded the new Shannon boat for Montrose with the money coming from the estate of Ruth Grant Smith. The boat will be named after her late husband Ian Grant Smith.

Notes to Editor: *Montrose is no stranger to innovations and relocations over a long history. Its first lifeboat, an eight crew rowing boat, had an exposed site at the south-west corner of the town’s bleachfield in 1807. This was one of five lifeboats placed on the coast of Scotland by Henry Greathead. Henry was the builder of the Original in 1789, the first boat to be built expressly for the purpose of saving life from shipwreck.

*In 1819, a lifeboat house was built beneath the lightkeeper’s house. Then, half a century later, the station moved further up the South Esk estuary and a slipway was added. In 1885, an additional lifeboat house was constructed at Kirkside on the north bank of the North Esk, where the St Cyrus Wildlife Centre is now located. A new lifeboat house was completed in 1900, with the old boathouse sold to Montrose Harbour Board for £100. More recent decades have seen lifeboats kept afloat at all times within the operational area of the port.

*The Shannon class features twin water jets instead of conventional propellers, allowing it to operate in shallow waters and be highly manoeuvrable. It has a top speed of 25 knots compared with Montrose’s current Tyne boat (17 knots) and, like all RNLI all-weather lifeboats, it is self-righting.

*The RNLI has a tradition of naming lifeboats after rivers or stretches of water, and the Shannon is named after the River Shannon in Ireland.

RNLI Media Contacts: Richard Smith, RNLI Public Relations Manager for Scotland, 07786 668903. Email Richard_Smith@rnli.org.uk