First-RNLI-Shannon-class-lifeboat-completes-‘live-capsize-trial-in-Lymington1

Byline: The first RNLI Shannon class all-weather lifeboat, named ‘Jock and Annie Slater’, has just completed a ‘live’ capsize at Berthon Boat Company in Lymington, Hampshire.
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As with other all-weather lifeboats, the Shannon is designed to return to an upright position in the event of capsize and can cope with roughest of seas. Live capsize is a prerequisite of the lifeboat being placed on operational service.

Chris Eves, RNLI Project Manager for the Shannon, says: ‘In a live capsize, the lifeboat is fully functioning with the engines running, all systems powered up, and the radar scanner unit rotating. The Shannon has continued to perform well and this is just one of many operational tests that it has taken part in since April 2012. Trials are coming to an end soon, although the RNLI continuously carries out work to ensure its lifeboats are fit for purpose. It’s thanks to generous donations that we are able to offer our extraordinary volunteer lifeboat crew the very best lifeboats and equipment possible.’

Following a special naming ceremony at RNLI College in Poole last month, the lifeboat has joined the charity’s relief fleet and will see service all around the UK and Republic of Ireland during her expected 50 year operational life. The Shannon is capable of 25 knots and is propelled by water jets instead of propellers for increased manoeuvrability, making it the most agile all-weather lifeboat in the fleet. The Shannon has been designed in-house by RNLI design engineers based at the charity’s HQ in Poole, Dorset.

Video from the capsize is available here.

Berthon Boat Company provided an ideal location for the Shannon’s live capsize as it has the water frontage, equipment and expertise to carry out the trial. Berthon Boat Company currently fit all the systems, equipment and machinery necessary to produce an operational all-weather lifeboat, after receiving the hull and wheelhouse composite structures from SAR Composites (an RNLI owned company).

About the new Shannon class all-weather lifeboat
• It is the smallest and lightest of the RNLI’s 25-knot all-weather lifeboats designed specifically to be launched and recovered from a beach.
• As the Shannon is propelled by water jets, these lifeboats can operate in shallow waters and the risk of damage to the vessel during launch and recovery, or when intentionally beached, is reduced.
• As with other all-weather lifeboats, the Shannon is inherently self-righting in the event of capsize and will be able to cope with the roughest of conditions.
• Over 50 new Shannon class lifeboats will need to be built within the next 10 years to replace many of the Mersey and Tyne classes of lifeboat, which are only capable of 17 and 18 knots respectively.
• Once the Shannon class is rolled out, every all-weather lifeboat in the RNLI’s fleet will be capable of 25 knots, ensuring that those in need are reached even faster.
• The Shannon follows in a 45-year tradition of naming the charity’s lifeboats after rivers, and is the first time that the name of an Irish river has been used, reflecting the fact our volunteers save lives at sea around the coasts of the Republic of Ireland as well as the UK.

Notes to editors
• Photo attached. Please credit RNLI/Nathan Williams.
• Footage of the Shannon’s ‘live’ capsize in Lymington is available on request.
• The Shannon class all-weather lifeboat costs £2M to build.
• The lifeboat is named ‘Jock and Annie Slater’ after a former RNLI Chairman Sir Jock Slater and his wife, Lady Slater, Sir Jock Slater was Chairman of the RNLI from July 2004 until November 2008.

RNLI media contacts
For more information please call Laura Fennimore, RNLI Public Relations Officer, on 01202 663181or email laura_fennimore@rnli.org.uk. Alternatively, call the RNLI Press Office on 01202 336789 or email pressoffice@rnli.org.uk. 

Byline: The first RNLI Shannon class all-weather lifeboat, named ‘Jock and Annie Slater’, has just completed a ‘live’ capsize at Berthon Boat Company in Lymington, Hampshire.
Page Content:

As with other all-weather lifeboats, the Shannon is designed to return to an upright position in the event of capsize and can cope with roughest of seas. Live capsize is a prerequisite of the lifeboat being placed on operational service.

Chris Eves, RNLI Project Manager for the Shannon, says: ‘In a live capsize, the lifeboat is fully functioning with the engines running, all systems powered up, and the radar scanner unit rotating. The Shannon has continued to perform well and this is just one of many operational tests that it has taken part in since April 2012. Trials are coming to an end soon, although the RNLI continuously carries out work to ensure its lifeboats are fit for purpose. It’s thanks to generous donations that we are able to offer our extraordinary volunteer lifeboat crew the very best lifeboats and equipment possible.’

Following a special naming ceremony at RNLI College in Poole last month, the lifeboat has joined the charity’s relief fleet and will see service all around the UK and Republic of Ireland during her expected 50 year operational life. The Shannon is capable of 25 knots and is propelled by water jets instead of propellers for increased manoeuvrability, making it the most agile all-weather lifeboat in the fleet. The Shannon has been designed in-house by RNLI design engineers based at the charity’s HQ in Poole, Dorset.

Video from the capsize is available here.


Berthon Boat Company provided an ideal location for the Shannon’s live capsize as it has the water frontage, equipment and expertise to carry out the trial. Berthon Boat Company currently fit all the systems, equipment and machinery necessary to produce an operational all-weather lifeboat, after receiving the hull and wheelhouse composite structures from SAR Composites (an RNLI owned company).

About the new Shannon class all-weather lifeboat
• It is the smallest and lightest of the RNLI’s 25-knot all-weather lifeboats designed specifically to be launched and recovered from a beach.
• As the Shannon is propelled by water jets, these lifeboats can operate in shallow waters and the risk of damage to the vessel during launch and recovery, or when intentionally beached, is reduced.
• As with other all-weather lifeboats, the Shannon is inherently self-righting in the event of capsize and will be able to cope with the roughest of conditions.
• Over 50 new Shannon class lifeboats will need to be built within the next 10 years to replace many of the Mersey and Tyne classes of lifeboat, which are only capable of 17 and 18 knots respectively.
• Once the Shannon class is rolled out, every all-weather lifeboat in the RNLI’s fleet will be capable of 25 knots, ensuring that those in need are reached even faster.
• The Shannon follows in a 45-year tradition of naming the charity’s lifeboats after rivers, and is the first time that the name of an Irish river has been used, reflecting the fact our volunteers save lives at sea around the coasts of the Republic of Ireland as well as the UK.

Notes to editors
• Photo attached. Please credit RNLI/Nathan Williams.
• Footage of the Shannon’s ‘live’ capsize in Lymington is available on request.
• The Shannon class all-weather lifeboat costs £2M to build.
• The lifeboat is named ‘Jock and Annie Slater’ after a former RNLI Chairman Sir Jock Slater and his wife, Lady Slater, Sir Jock Slater was Chairman of the RNLI from July 2004 until November 2008.


RNLI media contacts
For more information please call Laura Fennimore, RNLI Public Relations Officer, on 01202 663181or email laura_fennimore@rnli.org.uk. Alternatively, call the RNLI Press Office on 01202 336789 or email pressoffice@rnli.org.uk.