Anglesey-RNLI-volunteer-awarded-for-three-decades-of-lifesaving

Byline: Moelfre RNLI lifeboat Operations Manager Rod Pace has received a 30 year long service badge to add to his existing awards from the RNLI for his loyal service to the lifesaving charity.
Page Content: The bar added to his 20 year long service badge marks three decades of volunteering for the lifesaving charity and saving hundreds of lives from the seas off the Anglesey coast.

Retired Ships master in the offshore industry Rod commenced his volunteer role with the Moelfre RNLI lifeboat in 1978; however Rod was saving lives from the sea long before he joined the RNLI.

In 1964, at the age of 15, he and another member of the Liverpool sailing club launched their sailing dingy from Speke to assist two people on a grounded fishing boat in freezing cold conditions with snow blizzards and deteriorating visibility.
 
Eight years later he took part in a distressing rescue along with the Moelfre inshore lifeboat off Red Wharf Bay when without hesitation and care for his own safety he dived under a capsized boat and dragged the lifeless body of a man to the surface. Sadly the 22 year old man never recovered. For his brave actions Rod was awarded a ‘Commendable action letter’ from the secretary of the RNLI, it was this event prompted Rod to take an interest in the lifesaving charity.

In August 1982 Rod was a volunteer crewmember onboard the relief lifeboat ‘Vincent Nesfield’ when they successfully rescued two crewmembers from the catamaran ‘Triple Jack’ which had ran aground on rocks off Dulas Island in a strong South Westerly gale, heavy rain and very rough seas. For his part in this rescue he was awarded a ‘Velum Service Certificate from RNLI’.

In 1990 as helmsman on the Moelfre inshore lifeboat he was awarded a ‘Framed letter of thanks from the RNLI’ for his courage, excellent seamanship and teamwork for a service in gale force winds and nine foot waves when he and crewmember Anthony Barclay passed a tow rope between the grounded fishing vessel ‘Steel Venture’  and another fishing vessel. Crewmember Anthony Barclay also received a ‘Framed letter of thanks from the RNLI’ for his part in the rescue.

Five years later in 1995 Rod was awarded a second ‘Framed letter of thanks from the RNLI’ when as a crewmember on board the Moelfre lifeboat ‘Robert & Violet’. They launched into very rough seas and gale force winds to the catamaran ‘Alleycat’ with two people on board, one being violently sea sick. The vessel was found inside the surf line dragging her anchor and in danger of being driven onto the rocks. Rod was injured whilst transferring as a large wave drove the two vessels together heavily resulting in his leg being crushed and fractured. Despite his injuries he took over the wheel of the vessel and kept its head to sea whilst the dragging anchor was recovered and they were towed to safety.

In 2002 when as Second Coxswain he leapt from the Moelfre lifeboat ‘Robert & Violet’ in pitch darkness onto a disabled yacht in extremely violent seas and winds gusting over 60mph to secure a tow and rescue her two crewmembers. For his actions he was awarded the ‘Thanks of the RNLI inscribed on Vellum’. Coxswain Anthony Barclay was awarded a ‘Framed letter of thanks from the Chairman of the RNLI’ for his excellent seamanship, courage and leadership. The remaining volunteer crew received ‘Vellum service certificates’ for their vital part in the hazardous rescue.

Moelfre RNLI lifeboat station volunteer press officer Dave Massey said:

‘On behalf of the Coxswain and crew of the Moelfre RNLI lifeboat I would like to congratulate Rod on receiving this award. He has served the RNLI as a volunteer of over thirty years and his commitment, enthusiasm and dedication to the lifesaving charity has never waned and he typifies the volunteer ethos.

He has earned the total support and respect of the volunteer lifeboat crew at Moelfre. It’s his knowledge and experience that has always allowed him to fulfill his role as Operations manager to the highest possible standard’.  

Ends

Notes to editors
• Moelfre RNLI lifeboat station has been operating since 1830. To learn more about the lifeboat station go to www.moelfrernli.com 
• Attached is an image of the Moelfre RNLI volunteer Operations manager Rod Pace with his thirty year award.
• Attached is an image of Rod Pace involved in a rescue with the Moelfre RNLI lifeboat in the early nineties.
• Next year’s Moelfre Lifeboat day will be held on Saturday August 16th 2014.

RNLI media contacts
For more information please telephone Dave Massey, Moelfre RNLI Volunteer Lifeboat Press officer on 07917 267213

RNLI online
For more information on the RNLI please visit www.rnli.org.uk. News releases and other media resources, including RSS feeds, downloadable photos and video, are available at the RNLI Press Centre www.rnli.org.uk/press

Key facts about the RNLI
The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coast. The RNLI operates over 230 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and has more than 100 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 137,000 lives. The RNLI is a charity registered in England, Scotland and the Republic of Ireland.

Elusen sydd wedi ei chofrestru yn Lloegr, yr Alban a Gweriniaeth Iwerddon

Byline: Moelfre RNLI lifeboat Operations Manager Rod Pace has received a 30 year long service badge to add to his existing awards from the RNLI for his loyal service to the lifesaving charity.
Page Content: The bar added to his 20 year long service badge marks three decades of volunteering for the lifesaving charity and saving hundreds of lives from the seas off the Anglesey coast.

Retired Ships master in the offshore industry Rod commenced his volunteer role with the Moelfre RNLI lifeboat in 1978; however Rod was saving lives from the sea long before he joined the RNLI.

In 1964, at the age of 15, he and another member of the Liverpool sailing club launched their sailing dingy from Speke to assist two people on a grounded fishing boat in freezing cold conditions with snow blizzards and deteriorating visibility.
 
Eight years later he took part in a distressing rescue along with the Moelfre inshore lifeboat off Red Wharf Bay when without hesitation and care for his own safety he dived under a capsized boat and dragged the lifeless body of a man to the surface. Sadly the 22 year old man never recovered. For his brave actions Rod was awarded a ‘Commendable action letter’ from the secretary of the RNLI, it was this event prompted Rod to take an interest in the lifesaving charity.

In August 1982 Rod was a volunteer crewmember onboard the relief lifeboat ‘Vincent Nesfield’ when they successfully rescued two crewmembers from the catamaran ‘Triple Jack’ which had ran aground on rocks off Dulas Island in a strong South Westerly gale, heavy rain and very rough seas. For his part in this rescue he was awarded a ‘Velum Service Certificate from RNLI’.

In 1990 as helmsman on the Moelfre inshore lifeboat he was awarded a ‘Framed letter of thanks from the RNLI’ for his courage, excellent seamanship and teamwork for a service in gale force winds and nine foot waves when he and crewmember Anthony Barclay passed a tow rope between the grounded fishing vessel ‘Steel Venture’  and another fishing vessel. Crewmember Anthony Barclay also received a ‘Framed letter of thanks from the RNLI’ for his part in the rescue.

Five years later in 1995 Rod was awarded a second ‘Framed letter of thanks from the RNLI’ when as a crewmember on board the Moelfre lifeboat ‘Robert & Violet’. They launched into very rough seas and gale force winds to the catamaran ‘Alleycat’ with two people on board, one being violently sea sick. The vessel was found inside the surf line dragging her anchor and in danger of being driven onto the rocks. Rod was injured whilst transferring as a large wave drove the two vessels together heavily resulting in his leg being crushed and fractured. Despite his injuries he took over the wheel of the vessel and kept its head to sea whilst the dragging anchor was recovered and they were towed to safety.

In 2002 when as Second Coxswain he leapt from the Moelfre lifeboat ‘Robert & Violet’ in pitch darkness onto a disabled yacht in extremely violent seas and winds gusting over 60mph to secure a tow and rescue her two crewmembers. For his actions he was awarded the ‘Thanks of the RNLI inscribed on Vellum’. Coxswain Anthony Barclay was awarded a ‘Framed letter of thanks from the Chairman of the RNLI’ for his excellent seamanship, courage and leadership. The remaining volunteer crew received ‘Vellum service certificates’ for their vital part in the hazardous rescue.

Moelfre RNLI lifeboat station volunteer press officer Dave Massey said:

‘On behalf of the Coxswain and crew of the Moelfre RNLI lifeboat I would like to congratulate Rod on receiving this award. He has served the RNLI as a volunteer of over thirty years and his commitment, enthusiasm and dedication to the lifesaving charity has never waned and he typifies the volunteer ethos.

He has earned the total support and respect of the volunteer lifeboat crew at Moelfre. It’s his knowledge and experience that has always allowed him to fulfill his role as Operations manager to the highest possible standard’.  

Ends

Notes to editors
• Moelfre RNLI lifeboat station has been operating since 1830. To learn more about the lifeboat station go to www.moelfrernli.com 
• Attached is an image of the Moelfre RNLI volunteer Operations manager Rod Pace with his thirty year award.
• Attached is an image of Rod Pace involved in a rescue with the Moelfre RNLI lifeboat in the early nineties.
• Next year’s Moelfre Lifeboat day will be held on Saturday August 16th 2014.

RNLI media contacts
For more information please telephone Dave Massey, Moelfre RNLI Volunteer Lifeboat Press officer on 07917 267213

RNLI online
For more information on the RNLI please visit www.rnli.org.uk. News releases and other media resources, including RSS feeds, downloadable photos and video, are available at the RNLI Press Centre www.rnli.org.uk/press

Key facts about the RNLI
The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coast. The RNLI operates over 230 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and has more than 100 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 137,000 lives. The RNLI is a charity registered in England, Scotland and the Republic of Ireland.

Elusen sydd wedi ei chofrestru yn Lloegr, yr Alban a Gweriniaeth Iwerddon