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Byline: The volunteer crews of both of Rhyl’s lifeboats had a fairly hectic few hours on the afternoon of Saturday 17 May 2014.
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At 3.13pm, A Dory-type small boat with 3 people on board called the Rhyl harbour master to say his boat had broken down, 1/4 mile off the end perch at Rhyl. The boat also displayed a distress signal. The mechanic who was at the station contacted Holyhead Coastguard, and the pagers were activated. The Inshore lifeboat was launched within 3 minutes and proceeded to the vessel. in the meantime, a charter fishing vessel passing by had attached a tow to the casualty vessel. The crew then stood by until all vessels were safely in Rhyl harbour. The casualty vessel had to then go back under the blue bridge, and so the lifeboat crew took up a tow and brought the vessel to shore where it had launched from. The crew returned to station at 3.50pm.

 Then, at 5.15pm, Both boats were launched after a windfarm support vessel returning to the port of Mostyn recovered an empty inflatable with an oar and a used can of beer inside. Holyhead Coastguard contacted the station, and the pagers were set off. The boats proceeded to search about a mile offshore between Prestatyn and Talacre and on the exposed parts of the North Hoyle sandbank offshore. Rhyl local coastguard team was also alerted, and proceeded to the Point of Air to check with people on the beach to see if they had seen anything. As the boats were nearing the Point of Air lighthouse, Rhyl coastguards reported they had spoken to a group of  youths near the lighthouse, and they had admitted the inflatable was theirs. They had been out in the dinghy, and had got into trouble, being swept out to sea. They left the dinghy and swam ashore, 1 of the youths having great difficulty doing this. The coastguards asked if all were well and accounted for, and the party said they were all OK. The search was called off, both of Rhyl’s boats returning to station at 1900. The local coastguards gave the party a strict lecture on sea safety, and then returned back to Rhyl.

Coxswain Martin Jones says ” Whilst we were searching, the weather deteriorated quite rapidly and the wind got up. The outcome may have been much worse as no authorities were told of the boat in trouble. We are, however, happy the people were found safe and well.”

Byline: The volunteer crews of both of Rhyl's lifeboats had a fairly hectic few hours on the afternoon of Saturday 17 May 2014.
Page Content:

At 3.13pm, A Dory-type small boat with 3 people on board called the Rhyl harbour master to say his boat had broken down, 1/4 mile off the end perch at Rhyl. The boat also displayed a distress signal. The mechanic who was at the station contacted Holyhead Coastguard, and the pagers were activated. The Inshore lifeboat was launched within 3 minutes and proceeded to the vessel. in the meantime, a charter fishing vessel passing by had attached a tow to the casualty vessel. The crew then stood by until all vessels were safely in Rhyl harbour. The casualty vessel had to then go back under the blue bridge, and so the lifeboat crew took up a tow and brought the vessel to shore where it had launched from. The crew returned to station at 3.50pm.

 Then, at 5.15pm, Both boats were launched after a windfarm support vessel returning to the port of Mostyn recovered an empty inflatable with an oar and a used can of beer inside. Holyhead Coastguard contacted the station, and the pagers were set off. The boats proceeded to search about a mile offshore between Prestatyn and Talacre and on the exposed parts of the North Hoyle sandbank offshore. Rhyl local coastguard team was also alerted, and proceeded to the Point of Air to check with people on the beach to see if they had seen anything. As the boats were nearing the Point of Air lighthouse, Rhyl coastguards reported they had spoken to a group of  youths near the lighthouse, and they had admitted the inflatable was theirs. They had been out in the dinghy, and had got into trouble, being swept out to sea. They left the dinghy and swam ashore, 1 of the youths having great difficulty doing this. The coastguards asked if all were well and accounted for, and the party said they were all OK. The search was called off, both of Rhyl's boats returning to station at 1900. The local coastguards gave the party a strict lecture on sea safety, and then returned back to Rhyl.

Coxswain Martin Jones says " Whilst we were searching, the weather deteriorated quite rapidly and the wind got up. The outcome may have been much worse as no authorities were told of the boat in trouble. We are, however, happy the people were found safe and well."