RNLI-engineer-to-receive-MBE-for-her-role-in-design-of-40-knot-London-lifeboats

Byline: An RNLI engineer is among a handful of individuals being recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours for their contribution to saving lives at sea.
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They are the fastest lifeboats in the RNLI’s fleet, launching on the River Thames almost 500 times in 2013 and helping save the lives of 19 people.

Now the principal naval architect responsible for project managing the design and manufacture of the E class lifeboat is to be made a Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE) in recognition of her painstaking and tireless dedication to lifesaving. 

Holly Phillips has been involved with the RNLI for almost 20 years, joining first as a volunteer crew member and, in 2002, as the Institution’s senior naval architect, working on the design and manufacture of lifeboats.

Over the last three years she has worked tirelessly at the charity’s Headquarters in Poole, Dorset, helping to develop agile yet technologically advanced lifeboats that can be used to save lives on the testing waterways of the River Thames.

The work of designing such a lifeboat is painstaking and immensely detailed, and requires consideration of many factors – performance, reliability, casualty care, environmental footprint, crew safety and cost.

E class lifeboats are the busiest and fastest lifeboats in the RNLI. They use cutting-edge technology, yet they must allow for the best possible treatment of casualties and also be of robust construction.

As well as working alongside her team of naval architects, Holly has become a champion of engineering as a profession, and a compelling role model for female engineering students. She co-ordinates a number of research and development projects between the RNLI and the University of Southampton’s Engineering and Environment Faculty, a relationship which has provided numerous practical solutions to difficult technical problems over the last 10 years.

Holly says: ‘It’s a great honour to be awarded with an MBE. I consider it to be a team award for all the hard work that goes into the design and manufacture of RNLI lifeboats.’

She first joined the crew at Poole lifeboat station as a volunteer in 1994, and is also a lead member of her local gig rowing club which organises events to support the RNLI and the community of Swanage. 

Paul Boissier, the RNLI’s Chief Executive, said: ‘Holly works constantly for the safety, welfare and to further our aim of saving lives at sea, yet she never thinks to push herself into the limelight for recognition or thanks. I am thrilled that she is being recognised with an MBE.’

Meanwhile, other volunteers from the charity have also been recognised in the 2014 Queen’s Birthday Honours List for their selfless commitment. David Williams, from Aberdovey in North Wales, will receive an MBE for his services both to the RNLI as Lifeboat Operations Manager and as a leader of the town’s Mountain Search and Rescue Team.

David, 63, first became an RNLI volunteer in the early eighties, when he joined as a helmsman. In 1996, he was made Lifeboat Operations Manager, a voluntary post that carries great accountability as it assumes responsibility for launching a lifeboat and its crew on a rescue mission.

As well as volunteering his time for the charity that saves lives at sea, David has been regularly deployed on search and rescue missions as leader of the Aberdyfi Mountain Rescue Team in the Arenig Mountain Range in South Gwynedd and the Dovey Forest.

Despite these two time-consuming commitments, David still works as a Senior Park Warden in the Snowdonia National Park and regularly deploys into the mountains with his rescue teams.

Nigel Sweeny, from Jersey, will also receive an MBE to mark his ‘outstanding courage and unstinting leadership’ both as a volunteer crew member and more recently as a Lifeboat Operations Manager for the RNLI. He first joined as a volunteer at St Catherine’s lifeboat station in the late seventies.

He is known in the community as a tireless, highly capable and welcoming man, also giving his time as Governor of Jersey’s De La Salle College, whilst also running his own busy building surveying business.

Meanwhile two fundraisers will receive the British Empire Medal for their tireless efforts in raising vital funds for the charity’s lifesaving service. Richard Mead, from Guildford in Surrey, is credited with increasing annual turnover by 43% in just three years. He also encouraged branches within the same county to work together, pooling effort and resources, and in doing so increased donations by £20,000 – the equivalent cost of equipping and training 14 new crew members, or half the cost of a new inshore lifeboat.

Mary Rowe has led a team of fundraisers for almost half a century in Roundhay, West Yorkshire. She has organised swimming lessons for young children to increase their awareness of staying safe when on holiday, and is often found helping others at the most difficult of times, organising social evenings and taxying those who cannot drive on weekly shopping trips.

And Shirley Rogerson, volunteer shop manager at Treaddur Bay in Wales, also receives the British Empire Medal for her tirless commitment to the charity that saves lives at sea.

Paul continues: ‘It is fantastic to see so many RNLI people recognised in the Honours List. We are immensely proud of them all.’

ENDS
For further information, please contact:
• Lauren Hockey, Public Relations Officer on 01202 336134 or by email at lauren_hockey@rnli.org.uk
• Isla Reynolds, Newsdesk and PR Manager on 01202 663127 or by email at isla_reynolds@rnli.org.uk  

Notes to editors
• The Order of the British Empire recognises distinguished service to the arts and sciences, public services outside the Civil Service and work with charitable and welfare organisations of all kinds. There are five grades, as well as the recently added British Empire Medal (BEM)
o Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE)
o Knight Commander or Dame Commander (KBE or DBE)
o Commander (CBE)
o Officer (OBE)
o Member (MBE)

Byline: An RNLI engineer is among a handful of individuals being recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours for their contribution to saving lives at sea.
Page Content:

They are the fastest lifeboats in the RNLI’s fleet, launching on the River Thames almost 500 times in 2013 and helping save the lives of 19 people.

Now the principal naval architect responsible for project managing the design and manufacture of the E class lifeboat is to be made a Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE) in recognition of her painstaking and tireless dedication to lifesaving. 

Holly Phillips has been involved with the RNLI for almost 20 years, joining first as a volunteer crew member and, in 2002, as the Institution’s senior naval architect, working on the design and manufacture of lifeboats.

Over the last three years she has worked tirelessly at the charity’s Headquarters in Poole, Dorset, helping to develop agile yet technologically advanced lifeboats that can be used to save lives on the testing waterways of the River Thames.

The work of designing such a lifeboat is painstaking and immensely detailed, and requires consideration of many factors – performance, reliability, casualty care, environmental footprint, crew safety and cost.

E class lifeboats are the busiest and fastest lifeboats in the RNLI. They use cutting-edge technology, yet they must allow for the best possible treatment of casualties and also be of robust construction.

As well as working alongside her team of naval architects, Holly has become a champion of engineering as a profession, and a compelling role model for female engineering students. She co-ordinates a number of research and development projects between the RNLI and the University of Southampton’s Engineering and Environment Faculty, a relationship which has provided numerous practical solutions to difficult technical problems over the last 10 years.

Holly says: ‘It’s a great honour to be awarded with an MBE. I consider it to be a team award for all the hard work that goes into the design and manufacture of RNLI lifeboats.’

She first joined the crew at Poole lifeboat station as a volunteer in 1994, and is also a lead member of her local gig rowing club which organises events to support the RNLI and the community of Swanage. 

Paul Boissier, the RNLI's Chief Executive, said: ‘Holly works constantly for the safety, welfare and to further our aim of saving lives at sea, yet she never thinks to push herself into the limelight for recognition or thanks. I am thrilled that she is being recognised with an MBE.’

Meanwhile, other volunteers from the charity have also been recognised in the 2014 Queen’s Birthday Honours List for their selfless commitment. David Williams, from Aberdovey in North Wales, will receive an MBE for his services both to the RNLI as Lifeboat Operations Manager and as a leader of the town’s Mountain Search and Rescue Team.

David, 63, first became an RNLI volunteer in the early eighties, when he joined as a helmsman. In 1996, he was made Lifeboat Operations Manager, a voluntary post that carries great accountability as it assumes responsibility for launching a lifeboat and its crew on a rescue mission.

As well as volunteering his time for the charity that saves lives at sea, David has been regularly deployed on search and rescue missions as leader of the Aberdyfi Mountain Rescue Team in the Arenig Mountain Range in South Gwynedd and the Dovey Forest.

Despite these two time-consuming commitments, David still works as a Senior Park Warden in the Snowdonia National Park and regularly deploys into the mountains with his rescue teams.

Nigel Sweeny, from Jersey, will also receive an MBE to mark his ‘outstanding courage and unstinting leadership’ both as a volunteer crew member and more recently as a Lifeboat Operations Manager for the RNLI. He first joined as a volunteer at St Catherine’s lifeboat station in the late seventies.

He is known in the community as a tireless, highly capable and welcoming man, also giving his time as Governor of Jersey’s De La Salle College, whilst also running his own busy building surveying business.

Meanwhile two fundraisers will receive the British Empire Medal for their tireless efforts in raising vital funds for the charity’s lifesaving service. Richard Mead, from Guildford in Surrey, is credited with increasing annual turnover by 43% in just three years. He also encouraged branches within the same county to work together, pooling effort and resources, and in doing so increased donations by £20,000 – the equivalent cost of equipping and training 14 new crew members, or half the cost of a new inshore lifeboat.

Mary Rowe has led a team of fundraisers for almost half a century in Roundhay, West Yorkshire. She has organised swimming lessons for young children to increase their awareness of staying safe when on holiday, and is often found helping others at the most difficult of times, organising social evenings and taxying those who cannot drive on weekly shopping trips.

And Shirley Rogerson, volunteer shop manager at Treaddur Bay in Wales, also receives the British Empire Medal for her tirless commitment to the charity that saves lives at sea.

Paul continues: 'It is fantastic to see so many RNLI people recognised in the Honours List. We are immensely proud of them all.'

ENDS
For further information, please contact:
• Lauren Hockey, Public Relations Officer on 01202 336134 or by email at lauren_hockey@rnli.org.uk
• Isla Reynolds, Newsdesk and PR Manager on 01202 663127 or by email at isla_reynolds@rnli.org.uk  

Notes to editors
• The Order of the British Empire recognises distinguished service to the arts and sciences, public services outside the Civil Service and work with charitable and welfare organisations of all kinds. There are five grades, as well as the recently added British Empire Medal (BEM)
o Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE)
o Knight Commander or Dame Commander (KBE or DBE)
o Commander (CBE)
o Officer (OBE)
o Member (MBE)