Official-opening-of-Islays-new-lifeboat-station-building

Byline: A NEW RNLI station building costing about £500,000 has been officially opened by the charity
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The station is at Port Askaig on Islay, close to the ferry terminal and not far from the previous lifeboat station. The development coincides with the RNLI’s 80th anniversary on the island.

The ceremony took place on Sunday 29 June when Hamish Campbell, chairman of the Islay Lifeboat Management Group, opened the service.

Merchant banker Bruno Schroder, who lives on the Dunlossit estate on Islay, handed over the building on behalf of all the donors. The present lifeboat is the Helmut Schroder of Dunlossit II, provided by a Schroder family trust. The lifeboat is named after Bruno’s father.

Johnny Bergius, an RNLI Council member, accepted the building and handed it over to the lifeboat station.  It was accepted by Islay McEachern, the Lifeboat Operations Manager and then officially opened by 99-year-old Lily MacDougall, aunt of Mr McEachern.

The redevelopment is a substantial investment by the RNLI, made possible through the generosity of several supporters.

Those who contributed to the new RNLI building include the RS Macdonald Charitable Trust – The RNLI said, ‘The trustees have discretion to make awards to any one, or more , of six charities named in the original trust deed, and this includes the RNLI.
‘We are therefore fortunate to have received support for a wide range of projects in Scotland, including the redevelopment of Islay Lifeboat Station.’

The Hugh Fraser Foundation was another sizeable contributor. The Foundation has previously funded a lifeboat at Barra Island, and they have supported RNLI crew training costs in Scotland.

The RNLI said, ‘The island community is justifiably proud of its lifeboat and volunteers and, as another chapter in its history begins with the opening of its new station, that pride will remain undiminished.’

Mr Bergius presented awards marking the dedication of volunteers Terry Ferguson, Roger Eaton, Judy Ross, Margaret Campbell, Margaret Hastie and Neil McEachern.

Hamish Campbell said, ‘Thanks to fundraising communities like this one, our crew can put to sea when the call for help comes in, safe in the knowledge that the best possible kit and training is already taken care of. Local fundraisers really are the lifeblood of the RNLI.’

The former lifeboat station will continue to be used by the charity for storage, and the current mooring remains unchanged.

There has been an RNLI presence on Islay since 1934. In the five year period from 2009-2013 volunteers undertook 71 call outs and rescued 73 people.

RNLI Media Contacts: Richard Smith, RNLI Public Relations Manager for Scotland, 07786 668903. Email Richard_Smith@rnli.org.uk

Byline: A NEW RNLI station building costing about £500,000 has been officially opened by the charity
Page Content:

The station is at Port Askaig on Islay, close to the ferry terminal and not far from the previous lifeboat station. The development coincides with the RNLI’s 80th anniversary on the island.

The ceremony took place on Sunday 29 June when Hamish Campbell, chairman of the Islay Lifeboat Management Group, opened the service.

Merchant banker Bruno Schroder, who lives on the Dunlossit estate on Islay, handed over the building on behalf of all the donors. The present lifeboat is the Helmut Schroder of Dunlossit II, provided by a Schroder family trust. The lifeboat is named after Bruno’s father.

Johnny Bergius, an RNLI Council member, accepted the building and handed it over to the lifeboat station.  It was accepted by Islay McEachern, the Lifeboat Operations Manager and then officially opened by 99-year-old Lily MacDougall, aunt of Mr McEachern.

The redevelopment is a substantial investment by the RNLI, made possible through the generosity of several supporters.

Those who contributed to the new RNLI building include the RS Macdonald Charitable Trust – The RNLI said, ‘The trustees have discretion to make awards to any one, or more , of six charities named in the original trust deed, and this includes the RNLI.
‘We are therefore fortunate to have received support for a wide range of projects in Scotland, including the redevelopment of Islay Lifeboat Station.’

The Hugh Fraser Foundation was another sizeable contributor. The Foundation has previously funded a lifeboat at Barra Island, and they have supported RNLI crew training costs in Scotland.

The RNLI said, ‘The island community is justifiably proud of its lifeboat and volunteers and, as another chapter in its history begins with the opening of its new station, that pride will remain undiminished.’

Mr Bergius presented awards marking the dedication of volunteers Terry Ferguson, Roger Eaton, Judy Ross, Margaret Campbell, Margaret Hastie and Neil McEachern.

Hamish Campbell said, ‘Thanks to fundraising communities like this one, our crew can put to sea when the call for help comes in, safe in the knowledge that the best possible kit and training is already taken care of. Local fundraisers really are the lifeblood of the RNLI.’

The former lifeboat station will continue to be used by the charity for storage, and the current mooring remains unchanged.

There has been an RNLI presence on Islay since 1934. In the five year period from 2009-2013 volunteers undertook 71 call outs and rescued 73 people.

RNLI Media Contacts: Richard Smith, RNLI Public Relations Manager for Scotland, 07786 668903. Email Richard_Smith@rnli.org.uk