Barrow-inshore-lifeboat-attends-reports-of-man-trapped-on-a-sandbank

Byline: This afternoon, Sunday 13th July 2014, the Barrow inshore lifeboat ‘Vision of Tamworth’ was taking part in the mock rescues at the annual Barrow RNLI gala when it was dispatched to a real incident.
Page Content: The ‘Vision of Tamworth, crewed by volunteers Matthew Tippins, and John Walker under the command of Deputy 2nd Coxswain Dave Kell, was taking part in the mock rescue display in front of a large crowd at Roa Island, Barrow, when, at 1-35pm, she was dispatched to a real incident in the upper reaches of Morecambe Bay near the River Leven estuary, on the Flookburgh sands shoreline, 6.5 miles east of the lifeboat station.

At the time the weather was fine, but a strong breeze of Force 5 from the WNW was pushing the fast ebbing spring tide into waves with large swells of 2 metres.

Liverpool Coastguard had radioed the lifeboat direct on the emergency channel and dispatched them to the report of a man trapped on a bank somewhere near the location given. The crew were requested to search the Leven estuary between Chapel Island and Plumpton viaduct. They arrived at the scene at 2-10pm and began to search as requested by the Coastguard, whilst a team from Ulverston Inshore Rescue were searching the estuary from Plumpton viaduct towards Holker.

At 2-18pm a fisherman was located on the sands and was positively identified as the person reported trapped. He was fit and well so the lifeboat was stood down and returned to station by 2-55pm.

John Falvey, Barrow lifeboat spokesman said, “It happened in front of the crowd, one minute the inshore boat was there and the next she was disappearing around the end of Foulney Island en route to this emergency. It was quite a rough passage for the crew and a total distance of about 13 miles. The outcome was good and the fisherman is safe and well, that’s the main thing. It was a little disappointing that they had to leave, but it is quite a common thing that when we have an event one or other of the boats gets an emergency call. When they found out why the boat had left the spectators were very appreciative.”

Byline: This afternoon, Sunday 13th July 2014, the Barrow inshore lifeboat ‘Vision of Tamworth’ was taking part in the mock rescues at the annual Barrow RNLI gala when it was dispatched to a real incident.
Page Content: The ‘Vision of Tamworth, crewed by volunteers Matthew Tippins, and John Walker under the command of Deputy 2nd Coxswain Dave Kell, was taking part in the mock rescue display in front of a large crowd at Roa Island, Barrow, when, at 1-35pm, she was dispatched to a real incident in the upper reaches of Morecambe Bay near the River Leven estuary, on the Flookburgh sands shoreline, 6.5 miles east of the lifeboat station.

At the time the weather was fine, but a strong breeze of Force 5 from the WNW was pushing the fast ebbing spring tide into waves with large swells of 2 metres.

Liverpool Coastguard had radioed the lifeboat direct on the emergency channel and dispatched them to the report of a man trapped on a bank somewhere near the location given. The crew were requested to search the Leven estuary between Chapel Island and Plumpton viaduct. They arrived at the scene at 2-10pm and began to search as requested by the Coastguard, whilst a team from Ulverston Inshore Rescue were searching the estuary from Plumpton viaduct towards Holker.

At 2-18pm a fisherman was located on the sands and was positively identified as the person reported trapped. He was fit and well so the lifeboat was stood down and returned to station by 2-55pm.

John Falvey, Barrow lifeboat spokesman said, “It happened in front of the crowd, one minute the inshore boat was there and the next she was disappearing around the end of Foulney Island en route to this emergency. It was quite a rough passage for the crew and a total distance of about 13 miles. The outcome was good and the fisherman is safe and well, that’s the main thing. It was a little disappointing that they had to leave, but it is quite a common thing that when we have an event one or other of the boats gets an emergency call. When they found out why the boat had left the spectators were very appreciative.”