RNLI-celebrates-runner-success-in-the-Great-North-Run

Byline: The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is expressing its thanks and pride to a host of dedicated runners who completed the Bupa Great North Run on Sunday to raise vital funds for the charity.
Page Content: For some it was the chance to beat that elusive personal best while for others it was the opportunity to do something monumental in memory of a heroic rescue. For a few it was the first step towards an even larger fundraising challenge.

One of the RNLI’s 247 runners, Jack Lowe, an exceptional RNLI fundraiser and professional photographer who lives in Newcastle-upon-Tyne completed the race in 2 hours 20 minutes and 26 seconds. Of the three Great North Runs that Jack’s completed, he found this the most challenging.

‘I found the combination of sunshine and heat a huge challenge in the first 10km. At the halfway point my mind was telling me to give up. The thought of all the love and support I received helped me finish. After raising all that money, I just knew I had to keep my end of the bargain.

‘So, even though my run was really tough, in a strange way I feel the most proud of my run this year, simply for completing it!’

Having so far raised an amazing £1,132 of sponsorship of this year’s run, Jack follows in the fundraising footsteps of his actor grandfather Arthur Lowe, famously known as Captain Mainwaring in the TV series Dad’s Army, also a firm supporter of the RNLI.
 
The 2014 Great North Run also marks the beginning of another large and rather unusual fundraising challenge for Jack. This autumn Jack will embark on a huge challenge to photograph each of the 235 RNLI lifeboat stations around the UK and Ireland using an ancient Victorian process to make unique photographs on glass.
 
‘My intention is to create a show whereby each glass plate is hung geographically in order around a huge room. As the audience stands in the middle of the venue and looks around, the sensation of seeing the entire coastline of the UK and Ireland captured on glass will be extraordinary.’
 
The RNLI is set to receive a contribution from the plate photographs and image prints. For more information visit Lifeboatstationproject.com or follow @ProjectLifeboat on Twitter and fb.com/LifeboatStationProject on Facebook.

Those inspired to take part in next year’s Bupa Great North Run to help the charity that saves 23 people per day can sign up for a place on RNLI.org.uk/greatnorthrun from November.

Byline: The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is expressing its thanks and pride to a host of dedicated runners who completed the Bupa Great North Run on Sunday to raise vital funds for the charity.
Page Content: For some it was the chance to beat that elusive personal best while for others it was the opportunity to do something monumental in memory of a heroic rescue. For a few it was the first step towards an even larger fundraising challenge.

One of the RNLI’s 247 runners, Jack Lowe, an exceptional RNLI fundraiser and professional photographer who lives in Newcastle-upon-Tyne completed the race in 2 hours 20 minutes and 26 seconds. Of the three Great North Runs that Jack's completed, he found this the most challenging.

‘I found the combination of sunshine and heat a huge challenge in the first 10km. At the halfway point my mind was telling me to give up. The thought of all the love and support I received helped me finish. After raising all that money, I just knew I had to keep my end of the bargain.

‘So, even though my run was really tough, in a strange way I feel the most proud of my run this year, simply for completing it!’

Having so far raised an amazing £1,132 of sponsorship of this year’s run, Jack follows in the fundraising footsteps of his actor grandfather Arthur Lowe, famously known as Captain Mainwaring in the TV series Dad’s Army, also a firm supporter of the RNLI.
 
The 2014 Great North Run also marks the beginning of another large and rather unusual fundraising challenge for Jack. This autumn Jack will embark on a huge challenge to photograph each of the 235 RNLI lifeboat stations around the UK and Ireland using an ancient Victorian process to make unique photographs on glass.
 
‘My intention is to create a show whereby each glass plate is hung geographically in order around a huge room. As the audience stands in the middle of the venue and looks around, the sensation of seeing the entire coastline of the UK and Ireland captured on glass will be extraordinary.’
 
The RNLI is set to receive a contribution from the plate photographs and image prints. For more information visit Lifeboatstationproject.com or follow @ProjectLifeboat on Twitter and fb.com/LifeboatStationProject on Facebook.

Those inspired to take part in next year’s Bupa Great North Run to help the charity that saves 23 people per day can sign up for a place on RNLI.org.uk/greatnorthrun from November.