Over-10000-reasons-to-respect-the-water-says-the-RNLI

Byline: After a year that saw the charity’s lifeboat crews and lifeguards brave rough seas, stormy weather and rip currents to rescue 10,083 people, the RNLI is calling for the public to think ahead and never underestimate the strength and power of the sea.
Page Content:

In 2014:

• The charity’s lifeboats launched 8,462 times
• Volunteer lifeboat crew rescued 8,727 people, 368 of which were classified as lives saved*
• RNLI lifeguards attended 17,050 incidents
• 1,769 people were rescued by RNLI lifeguards, 92 of which were lives saved
• Overall, RNLI’s lifeguards helped 19,252 people both in and out of the water

Equipped and trained for any eventuality, it has been another busy year for RNLI lifesavers, with lifeboat crews launching 122 more times and rescuing 313 more people compared to 2013.

The busiest lifeboat station was Tower on the River Thames, which launched 543 times, rescuing 104 people followed by its neighbour Chiswick Lifeboat Station, which launched 219 times, rescuing 116 people.

The busiest coastal station was Poole Lifeboat Station in Dorset, which launched its lifeboats 121 times.
The most common cause for lifeboat call outs was to boats with machinery failure, which accounted for 1,652 of all launches (19.5%). Overall, 23% of total launches (1,927) were to powered pleasure craft and 19% (1,607) to sailing pleasure craft, 8% (668) were to manual pleasure craft. Commercial and fishing boats accounted for 7% of launches (610). 

RNLI lifeguards were also kept busy on the beaches around the UK and Ireland. 15.5 million people** visited RNLI lifeguarded beaches last year, and the charity’s lifeguards helped nearly 20,000 of those people. Taking to the sea to rescue people is a small proportion of a lifeguard’s job – 95% of their work is preventative. They aim to stop people getting into trouble before a rescue situation occurs by giving safety advice, putting up flags to identify the patrolled areas to swim or surf and directing people to appropriate signage. Last year the RNLI offered nearly 2.4 million of these preventative actions on their beaches.

With over 190 years of lifesaving experience, the RNLI is aiming to reduce coastal drownings by 50% by 2024. To do this the RNLI is expanding its safety programmes, like its national drowning prevention campaign called Respect the Water, and aims to save more lives by encouraging people to enjoy the beautiful coastlines of the UK and Ireland, but do so safely.

Will Stephens, RNLI Head of Community Safety said: ‘The very nature of the sea means it is unpredictable and even the most competent water users can be caught out. But it’s not just people who set out to use the water who end up in it – walkers can get caught out too as conditions can change very quickly or a trip could mean they end up in the water. We would urge people to respect the water, and never underestimate the power and strength of the sea.
‘Always be aware of the tide before taking to the water. Avoid areas where you could get swept off your feet in stormy weather and, if you’re visiting the coast, be sure to visit a lifeguarded beach during the summer months.’

In 2014 there were a number of notable call outs for lifeboat crews and lifeguards around the coast:
A 17-year-old crew member at New Quay lifeboat station proved his courage and selflessness when he slid between rocks and under water in a rising tide to free a nine-year-old girl who had become stuck between rocks while playing. Little did she know it was Tom Evans’ first service when he volunteered to squeeze between the rocks and cut her out of her wellies, allowing the rest of the crew to help pull her free.

In the north of England, two walkers were caught out by an unexpected wave which swept them into the sea at Staithes, leaving them both in fear of losing their lives. Talking to the RNLI they said: ‘It hit us like a train, and that’s the one that knocked both of us into the water… You can’t put into words our gratitude, thank you is not enough. It really isn’t. I still can’t get over that these guys put their lives at risk like that.’

During the summer, Joby Wolfenden-Brown, a lifeguard in Bude, Cornwall, paddled out on a rescue board to help a young boy who had got out of his depth and was calling for help. Once the boy was in sight, Joby called out to the boy to let him know he was on his way and reassure him he’s in safe hands.

George Rawlinson, RNLI Operations Director said: ‘RNLI volunteer lifeboat and shore crew and lifeguards have shown the commitment and courage we have come to rely on, but we must of course also thank our supporters and dedicated fundraisers, who work tirelessly to ensure our charity, which is dependent on donations from the public, can continue to keep launching our lifeboats and patrolling some of the coasts’ busiest beaches.’
*lives saved are defined as immediate risks to life, ie if the lifeboat hadn’t arrived on scene the person would not have survived

**RNLI figures

Notes to editors:
A compilation video of the RNLI rescues in 2014 is available here:

Key figures:

Lifeboats
8,462 launches.
Busiest station – Tower 543 launches
Crew spent 54,943.7 hours on rescues
121 launches in winds above force 7
3,188 launches were in darkness
8,727 people rescued
368 lives saved
1,101young people under 18 rescued
7,626 people over 18 rescued
508 launches where first aid was required.

1,652 launches to boats with machinery failure – the single biggest cause of incidents
4,415 launches to pleasure craft (includes power, sail and manual pleasure craft)
416 launches were to people cut off by the tide

Lifeguard:
RNLI lifeguards dealt with17,050 incidents.
19,353 people were helped by RNLI lifeguards
92 lives saved.
1,083 incidents involved major first aid treatment
11,884 incidents involved minor first aid treatment
Perranporth, Cornwall, was the busiest beach with 1,003 incidents

RNLI media contacts
For more information please telephone Kirsti Pawlowski, RNLI Public Relations Officer on 01202 663510 or kirsti_pawlowski@rnli.org.uk
RNLI online
For more information on the RNLI please visit www.rnli.org.uk. News releases and other media resources, including RSS feeds, downloadable photos and video, are available at the RNLI Press Centre www.rnli.org.uk/press

RNLI media contacts
For more information please telephone Kirsti Pawlowski, RNLI Public Relations Officer on 01202 663510 or kirsti_pawlowski@rnli.org.uk
Key facts about the RNLI
The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operate 235 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and has more than 200 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 1340,000 lives.
Charity number CHY 2678 in the Republic of Ireland and registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736)

Byline: After a year that saw the charity’s lifeboat crews and lifeguards brave rough seas, stormy weather and rip currents to rescue 10,083 people, the RNLI is calling for the public to think ahead and never underestimate the strength and power of the sea.
Page Content:

In 2014:


• The charity’s lifeboats launched 8,462 times
• Volunteer lifeboat crew rescued 8,727 people, 368 of which were classified as lives saved*
• RNLI lifeguards attended 17,050 incidents
• 1,769 people were rescued by RNLI lifeguards, 92 of which were lives saved
• Overall, RNLI’s lifeguards helped 19,252 people both in and out of the water


Equipped and trained for any eventuality, it has been another busy year for RNLI lifesavers, with lifeboat crews launching 122 more times and rescuing 313 more people compared to 2013.


The busiest lifeboat station was Tower on the River Thames, which launched 543 times, rescuing 104 people followed by its neighbour Chiswick Lifeboat Station, which launched 219 times, rescuing 116 people.


The busiest coastal station was Poole Lifeboat Station in Dorset, which launched its lifeboats 121 times.
The most common cause for lifeboat call outs was to boats with machinery failure, which accounted for 1,652 of all launches (19.5%). Overall, 23% of total launches (1,927) were to powered pleasure craft and 19% (1,607) to sailing pleasure craft, 8% (668) were to manual pleasure craft. Commercial and fishing boats accounted for 7% of launches (610). 


RNLI lifeguards were also kept busy on the beaches around the UK and Ireland. 15.5 million people** visited RNLI lifeguarded beaches last year, and the charity’s lifeguards helped nearly 20,000 of those people. Taking to the sea to rescue people is a small proportion of a lifeguard’s job - 95% of their work is preventative. They aim to stop people getting into trouble before a rescue situation occurs by giving safety advice, putting up flags to identify the patrolled areas to swim or surf and directing people to appropriate signage. Last year the RNLI offered nearly 2.4 million of these preventative actions on their beaches.


With over 190 years of lifesaving experience, the RNLI is aiming to reduce coastal drownings by 50% by 2024. To do this the RNLI is expanding its safety programmes, like its national drowning prevention campaign called Respect the Water, and aims to save more lives by encouraging people to enjoy the beautiful coastlines of the UK and Ireland, but do so safely.


Will Stephens, RNLI Head of Community Safety said: ‘The very nature of the sea means it is unpredictable and even the most competent water users can be caught out. But it’s not just people who set out to use the water who end up in it – walkers can get caught out too as conditions can change very quickly or a trip could mean they end up in the water. We would urge people to respect the water, and never underestimate the power and strength of the sea.
‘Always be aware of the tide before taking to the water. Avoid areas where you could get swept off your feet in stormy weather and, if you’re visiting the coast, be sure to visit a lifeguarded beach during the summer months.’

In 2014 there were a number of notable call outs for lifeboat crews and lifeguards around the coast:
A 17-year-old crew member at New Quay lifeboat station proved his courage and selflessness when he slid between rocks and under water in a rising tide to free a nine-year-old girl who had become stuck between rocks while playing. Little did she know it was Tom Evans’ first service when he volunteered to squeeze between the rocks and cut her out of her wellies, allowing the rest of the crew to help pull her free.


In the north of England, two walkers were caught out by an unexpected wave which swept them into the sea at Staithes, leaving them both in fear of losing their lives. Talking to the RNLI they said: ‘It hit us like a train, and that’s the one that knocked both of us into the water… You can’t put into words our gratitude, thank you is not enough. It really isn’t. I still can’t get over that these guys put their lives at risk like that.’


During the summer, Joby Wolfenden-Brown, a lifeguard in Bude, Cornwall, paddled out on a rescue board to help a young boy who had got out of his depth and was calling for help. Once the boy was in sight, Joby called out to the boy to let him know he was on his way and reassure him he’s in safe hands.


George Rawlinson, RNLI Operations Director said: ‘RNLI volunteer lifeboat and shore crew and lifeguards have shown the commitment and courage we have come to rely on, but we must of course also thank our supporters and dedicated fundraisers, who work tirelessly to ensure our charity, which is dependent on donations from the public, can continue to keep launching our lifeboats and patrolling some of the coasts’ busiest beaches.’
*lives saved are defined as immediate risks to life, ie if the lifeboat hadn’t arrived on scene the person would not have survived


**RNLI figures


Notes to editors:
A compilation video of the RNLI rescues in 2014 is available here:

Key figures:

Lifeboats
8,462 launches.
Busiest station – Tower 543 launches
Crew spent 54,943.7 hours on rescues
121 launches in winds above force 7
3,188 launches were in darkness
8,727 people rescued
368 lives saved
1,101young people under 18 rescued
7,626 people over 18 rescued
508 launches where first aid was required.

1,652 launches to boats with machinery failure - the single biggest cause of incidents
4,415 launches to pleasure craft (includes power, sail and manual pleasure craft)
416 launches were to people cut off by the tide

Lifeguard:
RNLI lifeguards dealt with17,050 incidents.
19,353 people were helped by RNLI lifeguards
92 lives saved.
1,083 incidents involved major first aid treatment
11,884 incidents involved minor first aid treatment
Perranporth, Cornwall, was the busiest beach with 1,003 incidents

RNLI media contacts
For more information please telephone Kirsti Pawlowski, RNLI Public Relations Officer on 01202 663510 or kirsti_pawlowski@rnli.org.uk
RNLI online
For more information on the RNLI please visit www.rnli.org.uk. News releases and other media resources, including RSS feeds, downloadable photos and video, are available at the RNLI Press Centre www.rnli.org.uk/press

RNLI media contacts
For more information please telephone Kirsti Pawlowski, RNLI Public Relations Officer on 01202 663510 or kirsti_pawlowski@rnli.org.uk
Key facts about the RNLI
The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operate 235 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and has more than 200 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 1340,000 lives.
Charity number CHY 2678 in the Republic of Ireland and registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736)