Humber-RNLI-tasked-to-drifting-container

Byline: Humber Lifeboat was diverted from exercise on Friday 6 February when a drifting container started to pose a danger to local shipping and nearby wind farm installations.
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The Lifeboat crew from Spurn point were exercising with the Coastguards new search and rescue helicopter when the call came through. A container had been sighted by multiple vessels but had now started to pose great risk as it was close to local shipping and the wind farm Humber Gateway. Initially two wind farm transfer vessels stood by whilst the Severn class lifeboat made its way approximately 6 miles south from its exercise area. Once on scene and the coastguards informed the Lifeboat crew made preparations in case the container was to get to close to the wind turbines which at this time were closer than 1.4 miles to the container.  

  
Martyn Hagan Coxswain of the Lifeboat said

‘A tug had been launched from Grimsby and tasked with recovering the container but we had to be prepared in case the container was to cause any problems before its arrival.’
The crew prepared lines and fenders and also made their small inflatable daughter boat ready in case a tow was needed to avert  a potential collision.

Martyn continued

‘Thankfully the tidal drift meant the container was slowly moving away from danger and was in open water when the tug arrived.’

The tug requested the support of the lifeboats daughter boat to assist in attaching a line, this was done before the tug used its on-board cranes to lift the container out of the water. The Lifeboat then escorted the tug for the first part of their passage to Grimsby whilst the tug crew secured the container and ballasted their boat. The lifeboat was then released to return back to station at Spurn Point.

Martyn concluded

‘Although the RNLI’s primary role is to save lives at the sea tasking’s like this are still serious; We prevented a larger incident occurring and even using our daughter boat to assist the tug meant less risk was needed in the containers recovery.’

 

END

RNLI media contacts
For more information contact Humber RNLI Lifeboat Press Officers  Benjamin Mitchell  Benjamin_mitchell@rnli.org.uk or Ian Harms ian_harms@rnli.org.uk  Telephone 0194 650228

Notes to Editors

The RNLI is a charity that saves lives at sea.
Humber RNLI operates a 17m All-Weather Severn Class lifeboat.

Follow Humber RNLI on social media:

Twitter- @humberlifeboat

Facebook- RNLI – Humber Lifeboat Station

Instagram- humberRNLI

Byline: Humber Lifeboat was diverted from exercise on Friday 6 February when a drifting container started to pose a danger to local shipping and nearby wind farm installations.
Page Content:

The Lifeboat crew from Spurn point were exercising with the Coastguards new search and rescue helicopter when the call came through. A container had been sighted by multiple vessels but had now started to pose great risk as it was close to local shipping and the wind farm Humber Gateway. Initially two wind farm transfer vessels stood by whilst the Severn class lifeboat made its way approximately 6 miles south from its exercise area. Once on scene and the coastguards informed the Lifeboat crew made preparations in case the container was to get to close to the wind turbines which at this time were closer than 1.4 miles to the container.  

  
Martyn Hagan Coxswain of the Lifeboat said


‘A tug had been launched from Grimsby and tasked with recovering the container but we had to be prepared in case the container was to cause any problems before its arrival.’
The crew prepared lines and fenders and also made their small inflatable daughter boat ready in case a tow was needed to avert  a potential collision.


Martyn continued


‘Thankfully the tidal drift meant the container was slowly moving away from danger and was in open water when the tug arrived.’


The tug requested the support of the lifeboats daughter boat to assist in attaching a line, this was done before the tug used its on-board cranes to lift the container out of the water. The Lifeboat then escorted the tug for the first part of their passage to Grimsby whilst the tug crew secured the container and ballasted their boat. The lifeboat was then released to return back to station at Spurn Point.


Martyn concluded


‘Although the RNLI’s primary role is to save lives at the sea tasking’s like this are still serious; We prevented a larger incident occurring and even using our daughter boat to assist the tug meant less risk was needed in the containers recovery.’

 

END

RNLI media contacts
For more information contact Humber RNLI Lifeboat Press Officers  Benjamin Mitchell  Benjamin_mitchell@rnli.org.uk or Ian Harms ian_harms@rnli.org.uk  Telephone 0194 650228



Notes to Editors

The RNLI is a charity that saves lives at sea.
Humber RNLI operates a 17m All-Weather Severn Class lifeboat.

Follow Humber RNLI on social media:

Twitter- @humberlifeboat

Facebook- RNLI - Humber Lifeboat Station

Instagram- humberRNLI