Busy-Easter-weekend-as-Tobermory-RNLI-hosts-award-winning-crime-writer

Byline: It’s been a busy Easter weekend for Tobermory RNLI as the crew hosted a visit from award winning crime writer, Alex Gray, and responded to a ‘Mayday’ on Easter Sunday.
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Tobermory RNLI’s volunteer crew launched the Severn class lifeboat, Elizabeth Fairlie Ramsey, at 1530 following a distress call from a 36 foot wooden hull motor yacht with two person on board which lost power close to the shoreline of the island of Oronsay in Loch Sunart. On arriving at the scene, the volunteer crew found that a RIB in the vicinity had responded to the ‘Mayday’ and had secured the motor yacht alongside. The lifeboat crew passed a tow to the casualty vessel and recovered it to Tobermory. The lifeboat returned to station and was made ready for service shortly before 1730. It transpired that the motor yacht had formerly been a Liverpool class lifeboat based at Flamborough Head. Launched in 1932, it was one of the last lifeboats to have been powered by engines, oars and sails.

The historical connection for the holiday weekend didn’t end there, however. Tobermory RNLI hosted a visit to the station from Alex Gray, an award winning crime writer whose grandfather, Alexander Noble, was the Coxswain of the first Tobermory lifeboat, Sir Arthur Rose, in 1938. Alex was in Tobermory to launch her latest novel, Keep the Midnight Out, which is set on the Isle of Mull and is published by Little Brown. Alex organised a raffle in aid of the RNLI, the winner of which, Crawford Whyte, will see a character in her next novel named after him. £200 was raised to help Tobermory RNLI continue to save lives at sea.

Alex said: ‘It was a huge privilege to be shown around the station and to be given a tour of the lifeboat. Our family has always been close to the RNLI as my grandfather was the Coxswain of the first Tobermory lifeboat. I felt that it was fitting to use my book as a fundraiser for the RNLI.’

Notes to editors

Photographs are as follows:

Alex Gray with Tobermory RNLI Coxswain Andrew McHaffie (please credit RNLI/Sam Jones)

Tobermory RNLI lifeboat crew, circa 1938. Coxswain Alexander Noble is second from the right (please credit RNLI/Tobermory).

The former Liverpool class lifeboat under tow in the Sound of Mull (please credit RNLI/Michael Stirling)

 

RNLI Media contacts

Sam Jones, Lifeboat Press Officer, 07747 601900, sam.j.jones@btinternet.com

Henry Weaver, RNLI Press Officer, 07771 943026, 01738 642946, henry_weaver@rnli.org.uk

Byline: It's been a busy Easter weekend for Tobermory RNLI as the crew hosted a visit from award winning crime writer, Alex Gray, and responded to a 'Mayday' on Easter Sunday.
Page Content:

Tobermory RNLI's volunteer crew launched the Severn class lifeboat, Elizabeth Fairlie Ramsey, at 1530 following a distress call from a 36 foot wooden hull motor yacht with two person on board which lost power close to the shoreline of the island of Oronsay in Loch Sunart. On arriving at the scene, the volunteer crew found that a RIB in the vicinity had responded to the 'Mayday' and had secured the motor yacht alongside. The lifeboat crew passed a tow to the casualty vessel and recovered it to Tobermory. The lifeboat returned to station and was made ready for service shortly before 1730. It transpired that the motor yacht had formerly been a Liverpool class lifeboat based at Flamborough Head. Launched in 1932, it was one of the last lifeboats to have been powered by engines, oars and sails.

The historical connection for the holiday weekend didn't end there, however. Tobermory RNLI hosted a visit to the station from Alex Gray, an award winning crime writer whose grandfather, Alexander Noble, was the Coxswain of the first Tobermory lifeboat, Sir Arthur Rose, in 1938. Alex was in Tobermory to launch her latest novel, Keep the Midnight Out, which is set on the Isle of Mull and is published by Little Brown. Alex organised a raffle in aid of the RNLI, the winner of which, Crawford Whyte, will see a character in her next novel named after him. £200 was raised to help Tobermory RNLI continue to save lives at sea.

Alex said: 'It was a huge privilege to be shown around the station and to be given a tour of the lifeboat. Our family has always been close to the RNLI as my grandfather was the Coxswain of the first Tobermory lifeboat. I felt that it was fitting to use my book as a fundraiser for the RNLI.'

Notes to editors

Photographs are as follows:

Alex Gray with Tobermory RNLI Coxswain Andrew McHaffie (please credit RNLI/Sam Jones)

Tobermory RNLI lifeboat crew, circa 1938. Coxswain Alexander Noble is second from the right (please credit RNLI/Tobermory).

The former Liverpool class lifeboat under tow in the Sound of Mull (please credit RNLI/Michael Stirling)

 

RNLI Media contacts

Sam Jones, Lifeboat Press Officer, 07747 601900, sam.j.jones@btinternet.com

Henry Weaver, RNLI Press Officer, 07771 943026, 01738 642946, henry_weaver@rnli.org.uk