Supporter-Award-for-campaigning-mother-motivated-by-sons-tragic-death

Byline: Andrea Corrie will be awarded an RNLI Individual Supporter Award at a prestigious ceremony in the Barbican in London after campaigning to help save lives after the tragic death of her son.
Page Content: Andrea’s son James Clark drowned in 2005 on the River Thames. Over the past 12 months she has worked with the RNLI’s Coastal Safety team on their Respect the Water campaign to help prevent other families going through similar tragedies.

She has allowed her son’s story to be used on campaign materials such as pint glasses carrying messages warning people of the dangers of drinking near the water at riverside pubs on the Thames.

Away from the campaign Andrea has also been very influential in the Kingston area, campaigning to improve safety around the river where James lost his life. And she has written a book called Into the Mourning Light, which aims to share her story in order to help others come to terms with bereavement.

Ross Macleod, RNLI Coastal Safety Manager, said: “By allowing us to use James’s story it’s really improved the reach of the campaign and got our important safety messages out to more people. Specifically letting us use James’s story on the pint glasses – and helping us write that story herself – it has really added an emotional element to the Respect the Water campaign. I can’t thank her enough.”

James, a 19-year-old university student, was out with his friends at a nightclub in Kingston-upon-Thames. After a fun evening of socialising and drinking, in the early hours of the morning the friends left, split into two groups and went off to find taxis. But neither group realised James wasn’t with them. 

Three days later, the police arrived at his mum’s door with the terrible news that James’s body had been found in the river. Among the emergency services called out was the RNLI.

Unbeknown to his friends, James had come out of the nightclub near the river Thames, stumbled in the dark and fallen into the water. This was a surprise because he was normally a strong swimmer. But James had drowned, probably as a result of cold water shock.

Almost immediately after his death, James’ mother Andrea campaigned hard for barriers to be put up along that particular stretch of the Thames. Three years later they were installed. Andrea said:   “When the RNLI contacted me I was so impressed that the RNLI’s main remit today is prevention rather than just rescue. It’s too late for James but not too late to make a lot of other people think carefully about what they are doing.”

She added: “I know James would be proud of what we’ve achieved in the light of his loss.”

Byline: Andrea Corrie will be awarded an RNLI Individual Supporter Award at a prestigious ceremony in the Barbican in London after campaigning to help save lives after the tragic death of her son.
Page Content: Andrea's son James Clark drowned in 2005 on the River Thames. Over the past 12 months she has worked with the RNLI's Coastal Safety team on their Respect the Water campaign to help prevent other families going through similar tragedies.

She has allowed her son’s story to be used on campaign materials such as pint glasses carrying messages warning people of the dangers of drinking near the water at riverside pubs on the Thames.

Away from the campaign Andrea has also been very influential in the Kingston area, campaigning to improve safety around the river where James lost his life. And she has written a book called Into the Mourning Light, which aims to share her story in order to help others come to terms with bereavement.

Ross Macleod, RNLI Coastal Safety Manager, said: “By allowing us to use James’s story it’s really improved the reach of the campaign and got our important safety messages out to more people. Specifically letting us use James’s story on the pint glasses – and helping us write that story herself – it has really added an emotional element to the Respect the Water campaign. I can’t thank her enough.”

James, a 19-year-old university student, was out with his friends at a nightclub in Kingston-upon-Thames. After a fun evening of socialising and drinking, in the early hours of the morning the friends left, split into two groups and went off to find taxis. But neither group realised James wasn’t with them. 

Three days later, the police arrived at his mum’s door with the terrible news that James’s body had been found in the river. Among the emergency services called out was the RNLI.

Unbeknown to his friends, James had come out of the nightclub near the river Thames, stumbled in the dark and fallen into the water. This was a surprise because he was normally a strong swimmer. But James had drowned, probably as a result of cold water shock.

Almost immediately after his death, James’ mother Andrea campaigned hard for barriers to be put up along that particular stretch of the Thames. Three years later they were installed. Andrea said:   “When the RNLI contacted me I was so impressed that the RNLI’s main remit today is prevention rather than just rescue. It’s too late for James but not too late to make a lot of other people think carefully about what they are doing.”

She added: “I know James would be proud of what we’ve achieved in the light of his loss.”