Three-callouts-within-one-hour-for-rescue-services-at-Rhyl-on-Sunday-2382015

Byline: A standby for the All-weather lifeboat to a full muster at the gas rig,11 miles out; then Lifeboat, Lifeguard and Coastguard units involved to assist over 60 to shore after they were cut off by the incoming tide around the sandbanks off Rhyl.
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The crew were already at the boathouse as part of their Sunday morning training.

At 9.46am, both Rhyl and Hoylake lifeboats were put on immediate readiness for a full muster alarm on the Douglas Complex gas rig, 11 miles out from Rhyl. As the lifeboat got to the water’s edge, Holyhead coastguard reported it was a false alarm, and all lifeboats were stood down at 9.55am.

The inshore lifeboat crew then had a very busy hour.

The first call came at 12.03pm, when over 30 adults and children were observed cut off by the incoming tide, on a sandbank just to the west of the station. The local beach lifeguards and coastguards were dispatched to the area to warn the crowd, and the inshore lifeboat was taken across the deepening gully to assist any stragglers who were out of their depth. The incident closed at 12.12pm. 

At 12.46pm, the services were again alerted to two adults and a child on a neighbouring sandbank, cut off by the incoming tide. The lifeboat crossed the gully, took the people on board, and recovered them to the shore. The local coastguard and lifeguard teams remained in the area to oversee any persons still being cut off, and warning the  public in the area to be aware of the tide coming in behind them. The lifeboat crew finished the tasking at 12.55pm. 25 people had been advised of the tide coming around the sandbanks behind them, and escorted ashore.

As the lifeboat was being recovered at 12.56pm, the coastguard team reported a small child in an iinflatable, off the west end of Rhyl beach, being blown out to sea due to the offshore wind. The crew came to the dinghy, but the child was still in sufficiently shallow water to be able to stand up and self-recover to shore. The boat returned to station at 1.02pm.

In all, nearly 60 people were assisted ashore, many not requiring lifeboat intervention, but the presence of the lifeboat crew, lifeguards and coastguards ensured everyone returned safely to the shoreline.

Coxswain Martin Jones says ” This was quite an intensive hour for us, but all the beach services combined to keep Rhyl beach safe for bathers to enjoy”.

Byline: A standby for the All-weather lifeboat to a full muster at the gas rig,11 miles out; then Lifeboat, Lifeguard and Coastguard units involved to assist over 60 to shore after they were cut off by the incoming tide around the sandbanks off Rhyl.
Page Content:

The crew were already at the boathouse as part of their Sunday morning training.

At 9.46am, both Rhyl and Hoylake lifeboats were put on immediate readiness for a full muster alarm on the Douglas Complex gas rig, 11 miles out from Rhyl. As the lifeboat got to the water's edge, Holyhead coastguard reported it was a false alarm, and all lifeboats were stood down at 9.55am.

The inshore lifeboat crew then had a very busy hour.

The first call came at 12.03pm, when over 30 adults and children were observed cut off by the incoming tide, on a sandbank just to the west of the station. The local beach lifeguards and coastguards were dispatched to the area to warn the crowd, and the inshore lifeboat was taken across the deepening gully to assist any stragglers who were out of their depth. The incident closed at 12.12pm. 

At 12.46pm, the services were again alerted to two adults and a child on a neighbouring sandbank, cut off by the incoming tide. The lifeboat crossed the gully, took the people on board, and recovered them to the shore. The local coastguard and lifeguard teams remained in the area to oversee any persons still being cut off, and warning the  public in the area to be aware of the tide coming in behind them. The lifeboat crew finished the tasking at 12.55pm. 25 people had been advised of the tide coming around the sandbanks behind them, and escorted ashore.

As the lifeboat was being recovered at 12.56pm, the coastguard team reported a small child in an iinflatable, off the west end of Rhyl beach, being blown out to sea due to the offshore wind. The crew came to the dinghy, but the child was still in sufficiently shallow water to be able to stand up and self-recover to shore. The boat returned to station at 1.02pm.

In all, nearly 60 people were assisted ashore, many not requiring lifeboat intervention, but the presence of the lifeboat crew, lifeguards and coastguards ensured everyone returned safely to the shoreline.

Coxswain Martin Jones says " This was quite an intensive hour for us, but all the beach services combined to keep Rhyl beach safe for bathers to enjoy".